Saturday, October 4, 2014

Fall Photo Journal of the Adirondack Mountains 2014

I remember it well. The first time we went to the Adirondack Mountains in the Fall was in 1970. I remember it because that was the year our daughter was born, and it was also the year my husband, Ted, got out of the military and started working for the New York Telephone Company (three name changes later - NYNEX, Bell Atlantic) and currently Verizon.







My husband started working for the phone company in March of that year so he wasn't eligible for vacation until the first week of October, so that's when we decided to head up to the Adirondacks. It wasn't too far away. Actually from Syracuse it's only about a 2+ hour drive depending on which area of the Mountains you would like to visit.

Fourth Lake 


That year in 1970, we headed up to Lake Placid first for a couple of days and then to Old Forge for a few days. We took the drive up Whiteface Mountain, and I climbed my first mountain in Old Forge: Bald Mountain (click on that link to see photos of it). That was quite a hike for me. At a few points on the (old) trail up the mountain they had a railing that was secured to the rocks to help you get a good footing on the rocks. My husband carried our daughter (10 months old) on his back in a carrier. When we got to the top of the mountain there were two women quite a bit older than me and they had skirts on and 3 inch heels! I could not believe it. Here I was struggling and they were hopping around the big rocks with heels on. At the top of the mountain there was a fire ranger station and from the top of the ranger station the view was magnificent! The fall colors were all a-glow and just incredible. The ranger station is still there (but I haven't been up the mountain in quite awhile).

Fifth Lake
I have not climbed any of the High Peaks in the Adirondacks, but I have climbed Snowy Mountain (the highest I climbed at 3,899 feet). Snowy is a 3.8 mile hike one way and we did it in one day. I also climbed Wakely Mountain, as well as Ampersand, Chimney, Baldface Mountains and several other trails.



This first visit to the Adirondacks started our life-long love of the Adirondacks for us. Just about every year we would spend some or all of our vacation time up there. Either the summer, the fall, or both. We went hiking, swimming, water-skiing, boating, fishing, and snow skiing there (not all at the same time though).

Inlet, NY


We spent several summer vacations camping on the Islands of Indian Lake State Park in the Adirondacks. The camping sites at this State Park are only reached by boat. So we had to pack our tent, sleeping bags, food, dishes, pots & pans, clothes, etc. in the boat and head out to our campsite. We were lucky in that most of the times when we were packing up or unpacking the weather was usually pretty good so you didn't have to worry about your gear getting wet (especially your sleeping bags and clothes). These campsites are referred to as primitive camping. Meaning you have a picnic table, fireplace/pit and outhouse (otherwise known as a pit toilet or privy). When you checked in at the campground office they provided you with a roll of toilet paper and a plastic garbage bag. (As I write this I find it pretty funny now when I look back on it. Actually, I can't believe you have to pay to go camping like this. hahaha)



The first time we went camping in the Adirondacks at Indian Lake, we set up, did a little fishing and then the rains started. It rained for about two days straight. So then we packed up and headed home to dry everything out. Well, it didn't discourage us because we were back up there the following year. Only then, each time we went camping in the Adirondacks, we expected rain. So we packed raincoats and umbrellas. When it rained that's when we usually headed to Speculator to go shopping. But as soon as the sun came out it was time to head back to camp and go swimming or water skiing. We would spend many a night playing card games like Uno, by the light of a bright Coleman lantern.

Seventh Lake


When camping like this in a wilderness area you have to be mindful of the wild animals like raccoons and bears. We had to secure our food and garbage at our campsite. Ted usually hung our garbage from a rope in a tree, and we stored our food in a camp kitchen that Ted made for this style of camping.

Seventh Lake


Another area in the Adirondacks that were popular with us was the Moose River Wilderness area. This is a dirt road that extends from Inlet, NY to Indian Lake. The dirt road is several miles long (40 miles +) and in some places extremely rough. You can camp in this area and hike, canoe or kayak, snowmobile, horseback ride (your own horses) and hunt. Here is a link to the Moose River Wilderness area.

Road in Moose River Wilderness area


The Adirondack Park  covers more than 6 million acres and is the largest park in the lower 48 States. There are over 2,000 miles of hiking trails, 3,000 lakes and ponds, and 1,200 miles of rivers. Approximately 43% of the land in the Adirondack Park is owned by the State, and 57% is privately owned. The area is heavily heavily regulated by the Adirondack Park Agency.

Moss Lake off of Big Moose Road north of Eagle Bay (can you see the people walking around the lake?)


We continue our visits to the Adirondacks each year. Sometimes we just go for a drive up there for lunch and enjoy the views.

For additional information on the Adirondack Mountains:  Wikipedia Adirondack Mountains and Visit Adirondacks; and a link to Hiking Moss Lake.



Hope you are able to visit some of your areas that offer views of the changing seasons. Each place is unique in its seasonal changes and they all bring us a view of magnificent glory! You have only to look for it -




Thanks for visiting! 
Hope you enjoyed your Fall Foliage Tour!
Feel free to leave a comment;
I would love to hear from you.


14 comments:

  1. My parents had a camp site in Booneville,just north of Utica.And we used to go up there almost every week end.This is the one time of year I get homesick for living up North.Thanks for the photos.

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    1. Thanks, Christene. That must have been wonderful up there. Sometimes we have driven through Boonville to get to the Adirondacks. It's so beautiful around there especially this time of year. Booneville's nickname is "Snowmobile Capital of the East"!

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  2. The pictures are breathtaking. Such beauty this time of year in the Adirondacks. Makes me wish I was at Lake Placid and Mark at hockey camp. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thank you, LuLu! We were very fortunate that the weather was great and that there was a lot of color on the trees this year. In some years the leaves have not been as colorful. I'm sure that after all the wind and rain that we had today (Oct 4) a lot of the leaves are already down up there. Thanks for commenting.

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    1. Thank you, Cynthia. It's very much appreciated.

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  4. You are in my fav spot...Moss Lake is such a wild area that has no facilities, great trails and only a couple of campsites...but the otters and loons are so amazing as is the foliage as a backdrop. I used to spend a lot of summers up in that area and camping on the beach at 8th lake. I also climbed up to Eagle's Nest which is a high point in Eagle Bay where you can see many of the lakes from some amazing huge rock outcroppings...a treacherous climb but only if you know the secret trail. Oh what a heaven on earth the Adirondacks..so glad you showcased them here.

    I haven't been for a couple of years due to health issues but we will be back next yr I hope.

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    1. Thank you, Donna. The Adirondacks have so much to offer at any time of the year. And you don't have to go too far to see the wildlife or the landscape views. We're very fortunate in that we live only a short drive from this area.
      We've seen the otters at Helldiver Pond in Moose River Wilderness area, and on several occasions we were able to see the loons when we camped at Indian Lake. I remember one year when we saw the loons with babies, but never got that close enough in our canoe to get a good photo of them. Would love to have that opportunity now.

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  5. Wonderful, this autumn-colors!
    Greetings from Switzerland
    Carmen

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    1. Thank you, Carmen. I'm glad you liked them!

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  6. I never that the distinct pleasure of visiting the East Coast during the fall and now I'm a quad, visiting through your images is still thrilling enough. Nice work, Sue

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  7. Wow...gorgeous! Your photographs are amazing and some of them could be paintings. I hope our fall colors here are even half as nice.

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    1. Thank you, Lee. I think all the rain that we had this past season in this area and the Adirondacks contributed to the beautiful fall colors that we experienced. We were fortunate that we were able to go when we did or otherwise we would have missed the beautiful fall colors.

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